Why and How to Use Google Analytics with Google Webmaster Tools

Why Link Google Analytics to Google Webmaster Tools

 

When people ask me how to use Google Analytics, this isn’t the first thing I teach them, but it’s near the top of my list. And the reason you want to do this is, it reveals 3 new powerful reports in Google Analytics that couple visitor activity with search data (impressions, clicks, average position, and click through rate (CTR)):

  • Queries
  • Landing Pages
  • Geographical Summary

The most powerful of which is called “Queries”. What you can do with this report is find keywords that are delivering traffic, but are not ranked well on Google (i.e. average position greater than 10). For example, if you have a keyword that is delivering you 150 visits each month, but it is ranked 36th on Google – imagine if you moved it into the Top 10 or even better, the Top 5. Think how much traffic that might bring. This is one of the best ways to get ROI out of Google Analytics.

The Landing Pages report is interesting because you can see which of your landing pages are getting the most impressions and receiving clicks. Just like the Queries report – you can see what the average position is for each landing page. Keep in mind, you could have multiple keywords driving the average position of a landing page.  If you want to determine which keywords are impacting a particular landing page, just visit the “Content” section of Google Analytics. Beneath it you’ll find “Site Content”. And beneath that, you’ll find “landing pages”. Once you reach that report, click on one of the landing pages you want to learn more about. Now find the button “Secondary Dimension”. Click that and choose “Keyword” from the “Traffic Sources” menu. Now you can see which keyword delivered visits for each landing page.

The Geographical Summary is cool in that now you can get a feeling for where your website is getting impressions (as in what Country). When you couple that with clicks or the click through rate, you might find that, for whatever reason, you’re as popular in Germany as David Hasselhof!

How to Use Google Analytics with Google Webmaster Tools

 

Please login to both Google Analytics and Google Webmaster Tools (if you don’t have access to one or the other, you’ll need to do that first – getting access to Webmaster Tools can be as simple as creating and verifying ownership of your site – follow Google’s instructions):

https://www.google.com/analytics
https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/home?hl=en

In your Google Analytics account, select the account you want to work on – if you only have a single website, there should be only one choice.

Now, go to “Traffic Sources” on the righthand side bar. Then, click “Search Engine Optimization”. Beneath that you’ll see “Queries”. Click to open that report.

It will have a screen that looks like this:
Google-Analytics-SEO

 

Click “Set up Webmaster Tools data sharing”. It will take you to a screen that has this:
Connect-Webmaster-Tools

 

Now, click the small “Edit”. Now, you’ll go to a screen that lists your available Google Webmaster Tools sites. Find the one you want to associate with the Google Analytics account and click the radio button next to it. Then, click “save” at the bottom of the list. Sometimes, you’ll get the following message from Google:

Associate-Google-Webmaster-Tools

Click “OK”. Sometimes you’ll get the following message from Google after clicking “OK”:

 

Google-Webmaster-Tools-Issue

If this happens, you’ll need to track down the person who originally created your Google Webmaster Tools account – they will need to perform this operation for you. If not, you should be good to go.

Go back to Google Analytics and click/refresh “Queries” and you should see a fantastic new report. Call me if you have any questions – (480) 270-4918.

2017-05-04T16:06:13+00:00 By |Business Dashboards|0 Comments

About the Author:

He has over 20 years of experience managing and leading the Ecommerce efforts of small, medium and large companies. He has held sales, sales management, marketing, operations, IS/IT, legal and executive management positions in start-up to multi-billion dollar organizations. He has also served as an adjunct professor of Ecommerce for the MBA program of the University of Missouri (where he received an MBA concentrated in Direct Marketing in 1989). He led the Ecommerce initiative for Sprint PCS (PCS) and Sprint (FON) as Vice President of Ecommerce. He led the integrated marketing efforts for Insight (NSIT) as Senior Vice President of Marketing and Ecommerce. Today, he is the CEO and Founder of Aidan Taylor Marketing – a marketing agency for small businesses (between $1 million and $20 million in annual revenue).

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